Sultan’s Run Golf Club – Jasper, IN

Intro
Sultan’s Run Golf Club just outside Jasper, Indiana, is a former horse farm famous for being the home of Supreme Sultan. This horse sired a record number of World Champion American Saddlebred horses and each hole being named after one of these horses. In 1996, Pete Dye protégé Tim Liddy was involved in an extensive remodeling project that has brought the course to its current high status.

On my visit in September 2008, I didn’t take nearly enough pictures. So many good holes on this course. Just how good is Sultan’s Run? Read on…

Course Description:
The round begins with the wide open 1st. Although woods are on your right, there is plenty of room to the left. A play to the right side gives is rewarded with the better angle to the green. As I learned the hard way… DO NOT be above the hole.

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At the reachable par 5 4th, the golfer must navigate between the bunkers on the right. If the tee shot is placed well, a decision must be made. One may bail out to the right for a layup and a clear shot at the green, or… go for it. The green, only 25 yards deep, has bunkers surrounding the green and a short drop off on the far side of the green.

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Two holes later, the golfer is tested again at the par 5 6th. The golfer may play safe to the left, but will more than likely be forced to layup. If the golfer can carry the bunkers on the right, they will be left with around 200 yards to the green. This is great birdie hole.

The next hole, the short par 4 7th, is another great birdie opportunity. The golfer may hit a long iron tee shot to be safe, to take fairway wood and driver and tempt to drive the green. A valley about 100 yards from the green that runs off to the right discourages the big shot. The front 9 closes with an uphill, dogleg-left par 4 that isn’t overly long, but is vicious at the green.

The par 5s are truly the strength of Sultan’s Run, and 10 is no different. A downhill, dogleg right par 5, with plenty of room off the tee. Things tighten up around the layup zone and the elevated green is protected by bunkers…

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My two favorite holes on the course are the par 3 12th and the par 5 13th, the later being my favorite. 12 is (another) downhill par 3, with water left and a bit behind the green. A great test of nerves after a fairly easy par 4 11th.!

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Even better is 13. The fairway is wide open until about 287 from the back tees, where two bunkers left will catch any driver shots sprayed left. There is a creek that crosses the fairway that, for the most part, isn’t in play. But catch one of those fairway bunkers off the tee, and the golfer is left a decision to lay up in front of the creek or attempt a long fairway bunker shot for the layup. Things don’t get any easier at the green, where a severe false front will reject any short shots and the three tiers can make three, or even four putts, common place.

After 14, which is blind off the tee and potentially to the green, comes the loop around a lake. 15 is a shorter par 4, where anything left means bunker (if you’re lucky) and water (if you’re not) and anything right means O.B. I liked the hole, but my playing partners were not as found. 16 is another downhill par 3 with a horseshoe bunker surrounding the green from left to right, leaving only the front clear. Players meet a watery doom if their shot is too far left or straight.

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There’s enough press about hole 18 at Sultan’s Run. I’ll just say that pictures can’t really do it justice and it’s easily one of the most stunning finishing holes I’ve ever played.

Verdict:
I absolutely love this place! On the whole, a fantastic variety of holes. My only knock on the layout is the similarity of the par 3s; all downhill with forced carry. That’s not to say a hole like number 12 isn’t a great hole.

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The 18th gets talked a lot about because of the big waterfall behind the green. Some how, in this author’s view, the effect looks completely natural. It was once said that a good 18th hole should be a good representation of the 17 holes preceding it. In that aspect, I’d say it’s dead on.

I played in September 2008 and everything was in great condition. Staff was friendly an accommodating to our group with had many people coming in from out-of-state. Pace was a bit slower than I would have hoped, but when you play a public course at prime time on a weekend, I don’t expect miracles. I paid $51 for 18 holes and cart. Course is walkable, but it wouldn’t be the easiest walk.

OINK Rating: 9

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Posted in Indiana
One comment on “Sultan’s Run Golf Club – Jasper, IN
  1. Chad White says:

    I just played this yesterday for the first time ever. I was very pleased. This past winter had basically ruined almost every course around here. NOT SULTANS RUN IT WAS AWESOME. EVERY BLADE OF GRASS CUT TO PERFECTION. ALL BUNKERS LOOKS PERFECT. The only thing I had a problem with was the greens. They were the fastest green3 I have ever putted on 9 my life not to mention the pin placement was very tough. Hole #1 I had a par but the next hole it got ugly fast. For the most part I struck the ball well but my putting was very poor especially the first 9. I shot a 95. 50/45. I had 2 or 3 pars the rest I 3 putted or more one and 2 OBs off the tees. I usually range from 78-85. I’m looking forward to going again. I live 59 miles away and it was worth the drive. The cost was $49 but cheaper there is a discount for Srs and after 2 pm during the week. The bunkers looked very hard to mow and I swear there wasn’t one blade of grass in any of the sand. Now like I said the greens were fast I think that’s the nature of clay based verses the sand based greens. One thing about the fast greens I had several spin back one on the par on the back nine par 3 16. Even though I shot a 95 which I was not happy I know it was because of my poor putting. I will play this course at least 1 time a month from now on. It’s the nicest I have ever played which includes $150 courses I have played while on vacation in Florida, Alabama, and Hawaii.

    Like

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